teaching gender respect

Andrew Tate: Why the blind hope of a mother needs urgent help from the underworld

By Naomi Barnes

Andrew Tate, sent to trial overnight, is a hugely popular influencer whose extreme misogynistic views are infiltrating classrooms and playgrounds across the world. His impact on classroom behaviour has been reported in popular media and include teachers overhearing jokes about sexual violence and  children writing misogynistic essays. Wescott and Roberts recently published insights on their

What schools should do now to empower their non-binary students

By Mary Lou Rasmussen

The decision this week by the Federal government to pull the Religious Discrimination Bill illustrates that in the current climate it is not actually possible to get such legislation through parliament.  I assumed the Bill might at least make it to the Senate.  As far as the Morrison government is concerned, I wonder if it’s

Do elite private boys’ school alumni have justice politics?

By Claire Charles

Featured Symposium at AARE 2021: Elite private boys’ schooling, feminism and gender justice: reimagining research in a post

Six things schools need to do now to stop gendered violence

By Amanda Keddie

Wesley College refers sexual assault and harassment complaints to police (ABC News, March 2021) Abuse Scandal Shocks St

If you want gender justice, should you ban private boys’ schools?

By George Variyan

The “offensive and misogynistic behaviour” of elite private school boys that routinely erupts into the public consciousness is not an aberration. It is a byproduct of the heterosexist ‘machinery’ that organises relational life within these schools (Variyan & Wilkinson, under review).  There is strong evidence that young female teachers are being responsibilised for boys sexually

Gender respect: how can we better engage boys and men?

By Amanda Keddie

It is September 2016 and I have been invited to speak on a panel with Rosie Batty, former Australian of the Year. We are speaking about the role of education in preventing violence against women and children. The conference title is pertinent: Prevalent and Preventable. The panel is mostly education leaders. One by one, they